These Great Dames Are Aging Gracefully

by | Jul 16, 2017 | I've Been Thinking, The Sunday Paper

These Great Dames Are Aging Gracefully

by | Jul 16, 2017 | I've Been Thinking, The Sunday Paper

“The women in this issue of The Sunday Paper are cut from the same cloth and the same mold as my mother (although they brush their hair, wear beautiful clothes, etc.). They are all still at it. They own the room when they walk in. They are personally inspiring to me because age doesn’t slow them down.”

Every week here at The Sunday Paper, we try to get above the noise of the week and offer positive perspectives to get you thinking, dreaming and talking about something you may not have considered before.

To that end, this issue is dedicated to awesome and inspiring Great Dames. Not great danes. 🙂 Great DAMES. Yes, Dames.

Why?

I wanted to write about Dames this week because my mother—one helluva Dame herself—was honored at ESPN’s ESPY Awards Wednesday night for her relentless work on behalf of those with intellectual disabilities. (Great DameMichelle Obama presented the award.)

What a night it was. I was moved, motivated, inspired, deeply touched, and prouder than a peacock. I was proud that my mother got the recognition she deserved, and proud that she worked her whole life pushing boundaries right through and into her 80s.

I remember her telling me when she was 85 or so, “You know, Maria, there is no excuse not to work nonstop until you are at least 80.”

“At 80,” she said, “I had some issues here and there (lol, that’s an understatement, but she continued ), but I didn’t give in. I just kept working. There is so much to do.”

My mother didn’t understand retirement. She didn’t understand slowing down to smell the roses. It just wasn’t her forte.

Changing the world was her forte. Her approach to life and work made me think about how many other great Dames there are out there who are still breaking boundaries and changing perceptions about women, longevity and relevance. (Of course, there are plenty of men who are doing the same, but I’ll feature them in another issue. I have several to write about, so no worries.)

I call my mom a Dame ‘cause she wasn’t your average lady or woman. Trust me, I was very aware of this at a very early age.

She smoked cigars. She wore pants. She hung out with men. She played football. She tried to dunk you in water polo well into her 80s. She was a first class sailor, no matter the weather. She was just a first-class competitor in every way. There wasn’t a sport she didn’t try to master. There wasn’t a man she didn’t try to beat (or a kid for that matter, this one included).

She rarely wore makeup, rarely brushed her hair, never went shopping and never, ever got a filler or a facial. But, when she walked into a room—any room—every eye was on her.

Why? Because she was an original. The real deal.

My mother was wicked smart, fun, challenging, and fearless. She was intimidating, for sure, but she was authentically herself. In today’s world, you would call her fierce. A force of nature. People often remarked that she was “a lot.”

The women in this issue of The Sunday Paper are cut from the same cloth and the same mold as my mother (although they brush their hair, wear beautiful clothes, etc.).

They are all still at it. They own the room when they walk in. They are personally inspiring to me because age doesn’t slow them down.

Which brings me back to my mother. This past weekend, I was at a friend’s wedding and got to talking to a gentleman who wanted to offer me some “helpful” advice to me as to how I might improve my social life. He mentioned that I hang around my kids and their friends a lot, and speculated that that, and my work, might be intimidating to some.

Then he said to me (or his vodka said to me…vodka usually speaks truth, in case you’re wondering): “You know, Maria, you are still very attractive (gee, thanks), you’re intellectually dynamic, but let’s be honest…you’re a lot.”

I wanted to argue with him, but then I stopped myself because I instantly thought of my mother, who everyone said was “a lot.” I also remembered a friend telling me about a wedding he went to where the mother of the bride stood up and toasted her new son-in-law, saying that her daughter was a lot,just like her, and that only really extraordinary men and people could handle those who were forces of nature. She then raised her glass to her new son-in-law, her own husband and to all of those secure enough to be in partnership with forces of nature.

So, this Sunday Paper is dedicated to all those who are proud enough to own that moniker, and to all those who accept that force as it is and let it rip. Just like my father let my mother roar. He knew a force of nature when he saw it, and how proud he was to be the one to celebrate it.

Just like I’m proud to celebrate all the forces of nature highlighted here, a.k.a. Architects of Change.

So, the next time someone is brave enough to call you a force of nature, or says “you’re a lot,” remember my mother. Remember her fight on behalf of those with special needs.

Remember that everyone said those with intellectual disabilities couldn’t compete, couldn’t go to school, couldn’t hold down a job, couldn’t marry, couldn’t live at home, couldn’t speak, couldn’t dream, couldn’t be included, couldn’t, couldn’t, couldn’t…

Remember this truth. She proved everyone wrong, she did things her way, and she embraced the force within and changed the world outside.

Be a force, ‘cause that’s what it takes to change the world.

P.S. And don’t worry if you forget to brush your hair or if you hang out a lot with your kids. Just blame it on the vodka! And, if you want to see a force of nature in action, watch the video of my mother’s ESPY award below.

NEWS ABOVE THE NOISE

NEWS TO MAKE YOU THINK

ARE WE READY FOR THE CARS OF THE FUTURE?: Tesla gained a lot of attention this past week when it released the first photo of its first mass market, mid-priced electric vehicle with autopilot mode. Self-driving cars are no longer as futuristic as they once seemed. In fact, they’re right around the corner. According to this New Yorker piece, Detroit automakers are aggressively experimenting with driverless vehicles as well. At the University of Michigan, students and staff members will soon be able to get around campus via driverless shuttles. This is a concept that scares me, but what do you think?

NEWS TO IMPROVE YOUR MIND

POLITICAL PARTIES DIVIDED ABOUT THE BENEFIT OF HIGHER EDUCATION: A new survey this week from the Pew Research Center reported that Republicans and Republican-leaning independents believe that colleges and universities are having a negative impact on the country today. Meanwhile, Democrats and Democrat-leaning independents feel the opposite. Are colleges partly at fault for our increasing division? It’s an interesting discussion. What do you think about the state of higher education in America today?

NEWS FOR YOUR DINNER TABLE CONVERSATION

POLITICAL PARTIES DIVIDED ABOUT THE BENEFIT OF HIGHER EDUCATION: A new survey this week from the Pew Research Center reported that Republicans and Republican-leaning independents believe that colleges and universities are having a negative impact on the country today. Meanwhile, Democrats and Democrat-leaning independents feel the opposite. Are colleges partly at fault for our increasing division? It’s an interesting discussion.

NEWS TO OPEN YOUR HEART

THIS 80-YEAR-OLD AND UP BASKETBALL TEAM ‘PLAYS TO WIN’: The San Diego Splash hoops squad will inspire you to believe that anything is possible. Watch the video above to hear their incredible story.

PASSIONATE VIEWS & POWERFUL PERSPECTIVES
FROM ARCHITECTS OF CHANGE

BETTY WHITE: I’M A ‘COCK-EYED OPTIMIST’ 

At 95, Architect of Change Betty White remains one of Hollywood’s most beloved stars. Today, she exclusively shares a few quick thoughts on how she’s maintained joy and a good sense of humor over the decades. READ MORE

ELAINE LA LANNE: THE KEY TO LONGEVITY? CHANGE YOUR HABITS.

91-year-old Architect of Change Elaine LaLanne is an incredible Great Dame who is keeping her husband Jack LaLanne’s fitness legacy alive to this day. She shares her perspective on the three things that have kept her healthy and strong over the years. READ MORE

AWARD-WINNING FILMMAKER SHEILA NEVINS KEEPS US HONEST ABOUT AGING

Architect of Change Sheila Nevins, the head of HBO’s documentary unit for over three decades, has lent her wisdom to some of the most powerful and award-winning documentaries of our time, including my HBO series “The Alzheimer’s Project” and “Paycheck to Paycheck.” Today, she shares her witty take on aging from her new book, You Don’t Look Your Age (And Other Fairy Tales). READ MORE

ARCHITECT OF CHANGE OF THE WEEK:

ELIZABETH DOLE: “MILITARY CAREGIVERS ARE OUR NATION’S HIDDEN HEROES.” 

Architect of Change of the Week Elizabeth Dole is a remarkable woman who has worn many hats over her lifetime, including senator, Secretary of Labor, Secretary of Transportation, and the president of the Red Cross. Now at 80, Elizabeth is devoted to supporting military caregivers via her Elizabeth Dole Foundation. Today, she tells us what propels her caring, and how she is Moving Humanity Forward.

 

>> READ MORE <<

INSPIRATION FOR THE WEEK AHEAD

SHOP FOR YOUR MIND

“My First Coloring Book Is On Sale Now!”

I’m so excited that Color Your Mind” is now a national bestseller! If you know someone with Alzheimer’s or another brain-related challenge, or if you know someone who is a caregiver, I hope you’ll consider gifting them with a copy. It’s designed with love.

READ MORE ABOUT WHAT I'VE BEEN THINKING

This Is What Happens When You Open Your Eyes

I’ve been thinking a lot this week about the pillars of the society I want to live in. The society I want to work in. The society I want to grow old in.

Love, as I wrote last week, is the guiding principle of that society. There are several other principles as well, which I’ll get to over the next few weeks. But today, on Father’s Day, I want to focus on the concept of kindness.

Kindness, I believe, is one of the most important qualities that we can have. It’s what can lead us out of our current atmosphere, which is anything but kind.

We rarely recognize kindness as a form of strength, but it is. It takes strength to lead your life from a place of kindness — whether you are leading as a father, an elected official, a teacher, a CEO, or as someone in some other role.

Being kind starts with being kind to yourself. You know that inner voice that so often berates you and everyone around you? That voice that tells you that you’re not working hard enough? That you’re not keeping up? That says, ‘Who do you think you are’? Well, when that voice finishes berating you, it comes out of your mouth and reaches everyone around you.

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What I Learned During My Spiritual Break

I’ve been thinking a lot this week about the pillars of the society I want to live in. The society I want to work in. The society I want to grow old in.

Love, as I wrote last week, is the guiding principle of that society. There are several other principles as well, which I’ll get to over the next few weeks. But today, on Father’s Day, I want to focus on the concept of kindness.

Kindness, I believe, is one of the most important qualities that we can have. It’s what can lead us out of our current atmosphere, which is anything but kind.

We rarely recognize kindness as a form of strength, but it is. It takes strength to lead your life from a place of kindness — whether you are leading as a father, an elected official, a teacher, a CEO, or as someone in some other role.

Being kind starts with being kind to yourself. You know that inner voice that so often berates you and everyone around you? That voice that tells you that you’re not working hard enough? That you’re not keeping up? That says, ‘Who do you think you are’? Well, when that voice finishes berating you, it comes out of your mouth and reaches everyone around you.

read more

If You’re Looking to Strengthen Your Family, This Message Is For You.

I’ve been thinking a lot this week about the pillars of the society I want to live in. The society I want to work in. The society I want to grow old in.

Love, as I wrote last week, is the guiding principle of that society. There are several other principles as well, which I’ll get to over the next few weeks. But today, on Father’s Day, I want to focus on the concept of kindness.

Kindness, I believe, is one of the most important qualities that we can have. It’s what can lead us out of our current atmosphere, which is anything but kind.

We rarely recognize kindness as a form of strength, but it is. It takes strength to lead your life from a place of kindness — whether you are leading as a father, an elected official, a teacher, a CEO, or as someone in some other role.

Being kind starts with being kind to yourself. You know that inner voice that so often berates you and everyone around you? That voice that tells you that you’re not working hard enough? That you’re not keeping up? That says, ‘Who do you think you are’? Well, when that voice finishes berating you, it comes out of your mouth and reaches everyone around you.

read more

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